"I think the reason we might have not seen these cases is because maybe victims don't understand that this is a crime in Missouri," said Knight. "We don't really have a specific crime for this cyber-type of situation, but harassment is something that seems like it could fit. It's not the best possible option in my mind."

That's because Missouri's laws are not staying ahead of new cybercrimes.

For a prosecutor to file harassment charges in a case of revenge porn, he would have to prove the suspect caused emotional distress and that the victim suffered.

The harassment charge would be a Class A misdemeanor, meaning the suspect could face up to a year in jail if found guilty.

Cybercrimes experts say it is important to note that if the victim in this type of case is 17-years-old or younger, it becomes a child pornography investigation. The charges for that crime are more severe.

Other states though are making greater strides in fighting cybercrimes.

In Florida, lawmakers are taking steps to make this type of crime a felony. The legislation specifically states that a person cannot knowingly post nude photos or videos with personal identifying information to online social websites.

Knight believes a law like that in Missouri may help victims.

"It looks like they might have the right idea there because it seems to me like it's reasonable that this should be a criminal offense," Knight explained. "It seems like our laws in Missouri aren't tailored for these types of crimes."

Searching through bills filed in Missouri the last several years, there are few that even deal with cybercrimes. Currently, there is no legislation in the works that would tackle the issue of crimes involving nude photos.

While laws are tying to catch up with the crimes, many say education is key.

"Parents speaking out saying 'thank you, we didn't know this was an issue,'" said revenge porn victim Toups.  "And, 'we've spoken to our daughters and warned them about this, we've spoken to our sons to not be that guy.'"

Since many victims are not stressing prevention, ABC 17 News checked in with schools to see what education officials are teaching kids about cybercrimes.

School officials said it is integrated into their curriculum and every student has to sign a technology use agreement.