COLUMBIA, Mo. -

A recent national study looked at more than a quarter of a million food trucks and restaurants.

The results show the trucks performed better than or as well as restaurants

"If anything out of pride and personal responsibility,  yes they are cleaner I want mine to be as clean as possible," said Mark Risch, a food truck owner.

Risch was in the restaurant industry for years before starting his own food truck called Como Dough.

He told ABC 17 News that the health inspections for his truck is the same as if he had a restaurant.

"We are inspected by the Columbia Health Department three times a year," said Brian Maness, owner of Ozark Mountain Biscuit Co.

He told ABC 17 News the layout of a food truck helps with keeping it clean.

"If you have a smaller crew you can keep things cleaner and you can kind of keep tabs on what people are doing. But also the space it's smaller so you have less surface area to keep tidy so that always helps," said Maness.

Now next time you are walking the streets of Columbia it might be a little harder to say no to food trucks or even a hot stand.

Food carts were also included in the study.

All food trucks are required to have a commissary kitchen meaning no food can be stored or cooked out a person's home.

Those kitchens along with the trucks are inspected by the city at least twice a year.